In Thailand, the figure of Ajahn corresponds to a master able to perform the functions usually exercised by monks, in particular he is able to make sacred tattoos called Sak Yank, a protection for those who wear them on their skin.


Once a year a ceremony called Wai Khru takes place, a ritual during which the disciples go to their masters to express their own gratitude not only to them, but especially to gods, and make their tattoos infused with new spells. Many devotees gather to renew the powers of their tattoos and some are overwhelmed by power. Sitting on their legs crossed under the hot sun and listening to mantras quickly recited by Ajahn, they receive the blessing and enter a trance called Khong Khuen, becoming their tattoos - the tiger, the crocodile, the old Hanuman and so on. 


The Ajahn, who wears a headdress depicting divinity, through a greater invasion of others, guides the crowd in prayer, and with the typical enthusiasm of prophetic fury, recharges the magical powers of all tattoos of all, also using expedients such as incense, fire, blessed water. His closed eyes, his curved mouth, the suddenly deep voice, the silent and alert audience, are some of the elements that make it clear what is happening at that moment and in that eccentric place so full of overwhelming mysticism.

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